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MAMF has partnered with One Community Auto

MAMF has partnered with One Community Auto, a car dealership that works with over 40 local charities to turn vehicle donations into cash to support their missions. And they accept more than cars. Donations can also include trucks, vans, RV’s, pop-up campers, motorcycles and more!

Your vehicle donation could translate into $$$ that can help support MAMF’s ongoing effort to showcase and honor those who also served–America’s Military Families.

To learn more, please visit www.onecommunityauto.com and fill out the donation form, or call One Community Auto at 505.901.9510 and indicate you are interested in donating your vehicle on behalf of MAMF.

The process is simple: once you make that decision and contact them, One Community Auto takes care of everything!


Author: Gail Hosking

From the Back Cover

Gail Hosking Gilberg’s father was a hero, a valiant soldier decorated posthumously with the Medal of Honor, a man who served his country throughout his entire adult life. But Charles Hosking was a mystery to his daughter. He was killed in Vietnam a week after her seventeenth birthday. She buried the war, the protests, the medal, and her military upbringing along with her father, so much so that she felt cut off from herself. It took more than twenty years for her to recognize the stirrings of a father and a daughter not yet at peace. Gilberg began a journey – two journeys really – to find out who her father was and in the process to find herself. She explored her buried rage, shame, and silence and examined how war had shaped her life. In studying the photo albums that her father had left behind, Gilberg found that the photographs demanded that she give voice to her feelings, then release her silent words, words that had no meaning in the world for her. The result was an epiphany. The photographs became the roads she took in and out of war, and her words brought her father home. Snake’s Daughter reveals the crossroads where a soldier father’s life and a daughter’s life connect.


Product details

  • Paperback : 224 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 0877455864
  • Publisher : University Of Iowa Press; 1st Edition (May 1, 1997)

About the Museum of the American Military Family


Have a good school story to share? Seeking submissions for new anthology

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Schooling With Uncle Sam will focus on personal memories–what it was like to work or study in the school system, to live and work in a foreign country or military installation – the mundane, funny, or tragic events and interactions that made for a memorable experience. Stories should be about a certain time, event, or experience about school/work/life with DoDEA (or with its predecessor organizations such as DoDDS, USDESEA, DEG, etc.) Authors included in the anthology will receive a free copy of the book in lieu of payment.  All stories become the property of the Museum of the American Military Family Special Collections Library. Proceeds from the sale of the book will be used to help the Museum continue to bring exhibits and programming to the museum community free of charge.This is a chance to preserve a unique history and to be a part of it. It’s an opportunity to share a personal look at a world-wide school system serving America’s world-wide interests and assuring that your involvement with it will be recognized. You can submit up to three different pieces for the book.


Military Family Books Available Through Amazon.com and Lulu.com

With its growing list of publications available through Amazon.com and Lulu.com, its outreach continues to celebrate a family’s role in our nation’s defense.

Two books from the 2018-2020 Writer in Residence Lauren Mosher are available on Lulu.com. They are: My Hero Dog and Brat Time Stories. Both are anthologies of stories submitted by military family members and are available on Lulu.com.

 

Also reappearing in 2020 is Battle Songs: A Story of the Korean War in Four Movements, a novel about four young draftees into the Korean War who carry their Western Pennsylvania upbringing into combat, and who among them survives.  Framed by its protagonist’s departure and homecoming, the novel’s underlying theme is the meaning of family and community under fire.  Thus, like the Museum’s other volumes, it spreads the word of its far-reaching mission. Battle Songs is available on Amazon.com.

 

The work of its  Writer in Residence Emeritus Paul Zolbrod, the novel adds to the Museum’s publications now available through Amazon.com.  Others include two anthologies compiled and edited by Zolbrod.  The first, From the Front Lines to the Home Front: New Mexicans Reflect on War, contains first-hand accounts of family ties to military deployment from the perspective of veterans and family members themselves.

The second, War Child, offers direct testimony to being a son or daughter of someone in uniform during this nation’s armed dating back to World War II.  Both volumes chronicle in direct childhood’s burdens and rewards in a military, and both are available on Lulu.com.

The latest museum anthology, On Freedom’s Frontier: Life on the Fulda Gap offers a personal look at what it was like to live along Germany’s East-West border during the Cold War. Over forty men and women who lived and worked along the Fulda Gap contributed their memories to paint a vivid picture of every-day life during this interesting time in history. Freedom’s Frontier is available on Amazon.com.

The Museum of the American Military Family (MAMF) is dedicated to collecting and preserving the stories, letters, photos, documents, and artifacts of parents, children, spouses, partners, and others who have supported a member of America’s armed forces.  MAMF also manages Operation Food Locker, a mini-mobile exhibit that circulates throughout the United States to help honor military children and their families.  All in an effort to surpass its regional identity as national institution.

MAMF’s SHOUT play, film and educational package are available for lease through the museum’s website.


Review: Battle Songs

 Those of us who faced the military draft during the years of the Korean War will readily identify with Paul Zolbrod’s examination and interpretation of all the emotions we felt at that time. Those who actually went into that war will appreciate his analytical and personal review of the battles, the missions, the soldiers, the officers, and the non-commissioned officers under the stress of combat and the anxiety about when combat will next take place.

Even the brief Prelude is compelling in the way it eases the Korean War into the classic and historic wars of all time and leads you into a narrative that brings out the best in those who serve in our military as well as the worst who serve.

Zolbrod’s book ties this “Forgotten War” in Korea directly to the farms and factories, schools and communities back home. Scholarly but worldly, factually and realistically, his story of the war and the people most directly impacted by it reflects much about the history and geography of our times as well as the author’s own knowledge of the past and his depth of research. His words prove that he was there, a witness to his writings, a participant in this unresolved conflict.

 

By weaving it around the lives of four young men caught up in the war, Zolbrod gives us a gripping and emotional tale of life and death, hopes and dreams, courage and cowardice, politics and statesmanship … in short, an engaging in-depth look at an American war that “people even then wanted to pretend did not exist and that people now have either forgotten or never knew of.”

 

Battlesongs by Paul Zolbrod

Available from Amazon.com


REVIEW: Camp Follower

Review by: Kim Medders

When I have occasion to compare Americans with Canadians, I usually only see our similarities. After all, our two countries share close cultural, historical, economical and military ties. Michele Sabad’s book Camp Follower illustrates how close we actually are as she leads her reader through the many twists and turns of the life of a child and later, wife of a Canadian serviceman.

My first introduction to Canada was in Germany in the 1960’s when my dad was stationed at the U.S. Army base in Karlsruhe. We would love to travel the 40 or 50 kilometres to Baden Baden where there was a Canadian Air Force base. They had a wonderful base exchange which, by virtue of NATO, we were allowed to use. We also loved their version of the Snack Bar and we always went down to the hockey rink to watch the players practice for a little while before leaving. The Canadians were always friendly and we enjoyed using their facilities, as I hope they enjoyed using ours. It seemed to be no more different than if we were visiting another branch of our own armed forces than another country’s air force.

This book is definitely a “brat” book. In it I was delighted to see our shared experiences as well as some of the background that I missed in our momentary and casual peeks into the Canadian military in our Germany visitations. One difference in the Camp Follower was understanding some of the terms like PMQ and CFB. I finally deduced they must mean, “Permanent Military Quarters” (On Base Housing) and “Canadian Forces Base”. One big chuckle was the term, FIGMO was explained as “F**k it, I got my orders” which is a common attitude among American brats and servicemen we refer to as being a “short timer”. The constant moving and how to reestablish oneself is also the heart of the book. Michele Sabad takes it further as she transitions from “brat” to a military wife and assumes those challenges as well.

The title is very apt and what initially drew me to the book. Camp followers were the families and girlfriends of army men for centuries before the modern military cared enough to acknowledge servicemen needed a strong family relationship to thrive. Those ancient camp followers had to fend mostly for themselves. We modern “camp followers” are more fortunate, but I think both countries could improve their treatment of the military dependents. Perhaps this book will, in some small way, resonate with those movers and shakers and help our lot. I highly recommend the Camp Follower to anyone who has been a military dependent or wishes a glimpse of a military life style.


CALL FOR STORIES: 75 Years DODDS/DoDEA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

On October 14, 2021,  the Museum of the American Military Family will observe the 75th anniversary of the opening of Defense Department Dependents Schools in Europe and the Far East by releasing a commemorative anthology,  “SCHOOLING WITH UNCLE SAM.”

The anthology will not focus on the school system history or governing policies but on  personal memories–what it was like to work or study in the school system, to live and work in a foreign country or military installation and move from year to year to another country or state  – the mundane, funny, or tragic events and interactions that made for a memorable experience. Stories should be about a certain time, event, or experience about school/work/life with DoDEA (or with its predecessor organizations such as DoDDS, USDESEA, DEG, etc.)

This is a chance to preserve a unique history and to be a part of it. It’s an opportunity to share a personal look at a world-wide school system serving America’s world-wide interests and assuring that your involvement with it will be recognized.

Your story  should be first-person and can be as long or short as you choose. Please also consider including black-and-white photos to help illustrate your memoir. You can submit up to three different pieces for the book.

Authors included in the anthology will receive a free copy of the book in lieu of payment.  All stories become the property of the Museum of the American Military Family Special Collections Library. Proceeds from the sale of the book will be used to help the Museum continue to bring exhibits and programming to the museum community free of charge.

Story suggestions … a unique classroom, your daily commute to school, your host nation neighborhood, a military “incident” in or around school, a favorite host nation restaurant or field trip experience,  a celebrity or high ranking or local dignitary visiting your school, something funny at school. Or an event memorable to you.

You need not be an accomplished writer to participate. MAMF will provide minor editing to sharpen your contribution.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, July 2, 2021. The anthology will be released at a public anniversary observance in October of 2021.

To submit a story, or for more information, please e-mail the submissions to OlsonAllen@msn.com.

To learn more about the museum visit the website: www.militaryfamilymuseum.org and follow us on FB http://www.facebook.com/MuseumoftheAmericanMilitaryFamily.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SOME REMARKABLE MEMORIES!

 


Military Family Books Available Through Amazon.com and Lulu.com

Corona Virus incursion aside, New Mexico’s spunky Museum of the American Military and Learning Center remains active in spite of its Tijeras location being temporarily closed. With its growing list of publications available through Amazon.com and Lulu.com, its outreach continues to celebrate a family’s role in our nation’s defense.

Latest of these to be available is Battle Songs: A Story of the Korean War in Four Movements, a novel about four young draftees into the Korean War who carry their Western Pennsylvania upbringing into combat, and who among them survives.  Framed by its protagonist’s departure and homecoming, the novel’s underlying theme is the meaning of family and community under fire.  Thus, like the Museum’s other volumes, it spreads the word of its far-reaching mission. Battle Songs is available on Amazon.com.

The work of its  Writer in Residence Emeritus Paul Zolbrod, the novel adds to the Museum’s publications now available through Amazon.com.  Others include two anthologies compiled and edited by Zolbrod.  The first, From the Front Lines to the Home Front: New Mexicans Reflect on War, contains first-hand accounts of family ties to military deployment from the perspective of veterans and family members themselves.  The second, War Child, offers direct testimony to being a son or daughter of someone in uniform during this nation’s armed dating back to World War II.  Both volumes chronicle in direct childhood’s burdens and rewards in a military, and both are available on Lulu.com.

The latest museum anthology, On Freedom’s Frontier: Life on the Fulda Gap offers a personal look at what it was like to live along Germany’s East-West border during the Cold War. Over forty men and women who lived and worked along the Fulda Gap contributed their memories to paint a vivid picture of every-day life during this interesting time in history. Freedom’s Frontier is available on Amazon.com.

The Museum of the American Military Family (MAMF) is dedicated to collecting and preserving the stories, letters, photos, documents, and artifacts of parents, children, spouses, partners, and others who have supported a member of America’s armed forces.  MAMF also manages Operation Food Locker, a mini-mobile exhibit that circulates throughout the United States to help honor military children and their families.  All in an effort to surpass its regional identity as national institution.

MAMF’s SHOUT play, film and educational package are available for lease through the museum’s website.


Author: Jim Defede

The True Story Behind the Events on 9/11 that Inspired Broadway’s Smash Hit Musical Come from Away

When 38 jetliners bound for the United States were forced to land at Gander International Airport in Canada by the closing of U.S. airspace on September 11, the population of this small town on Newfoundland Island swelled from 10,300 to nearly 17,000. The citizens of Gander met the stranded passengers with an overwhelming display of friendship and goodwill.

As the passengers stepped from the airplanes, exhausted, hungry and distraught after being held on board for nearly 24 hours while security checked all of the baggage, they were greeted with a feast prepared by the townspeople. Local bus drivers who had been on strike came off the picket lines to transport the passengers to the various shelters set up in local schools and churches. Linens and toiletries were bought and donated. A middle school provided showers, as well as access to computers, email, and televisions, allowing the passengers to stay in touch with family and follow the news.

Over the course of those four days, many of the passengers developed friendships with Gander residents that they expect to last a lifetime. As a show of thanks, scholarship funds for the children of Gander have been formed and donations have been made to provide new computers for the schools. This book recounts the inspiring story of the residents of Gander, Canada, whose acts of kindness have touched the lives of thousands of people and been an example of humanity and goodwill.